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Key takeaways from Wisconsin conservatives at Republican National Convention

Sun, 07/24/2016 - 5:26pm

Seven prominent Wisconsin Republicans, including Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., spoke at the Republican National Convention June 18-21 in support of 2016 Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

The Wisconsinites spoke about the importance of stopping presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and unifying the Republican party. In addition to Ryan and Johnson, Wisconsin natives who spoke at the convention included Gov. Scott Walker, Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke,  Republican National Committee Chair Reince Priebus, U.S. Rep. Sean Duffy, R-Wisc., and Rachel Campos-Duffy.

Walker endorses Trump at the Republican National ConventionFollowing Donald Trump’s official nomination as the Republican candidate for the 2016 presidential election, Gov. Scott Walker spoke at the …

Ryan emphasizes importance of Republican ideals

At the convention, Ryan said the American people want the political system to change — something they won’t see from the Democratic party. Instead, Democrats are offering another Obama term, just led by Clinton, he said.

The result of Obama’s presidency, Ryan said, has been “empty gestures, shady powerplays and constitutional limits being brushed off.”

Additionally, Ryan said progressive Democratic policies prevent people from gaining economic opportunities and make poverty worse.

“Progressives deliver everything except progress,” he said.

Part of the goals of the Republican party under the next president are to create a reformed health care system and provide care to military personnel and veterans, Ryan said.

Ryan said Republicans will work to eliminate barriers created by class and ethnicity and instead work toward respect and empathy.

“Everyone is equal, there is worth and goodness in every life. … That is the Republican ideal,” he said. “And if we don’t defend it, who will?”

Ryan said Trump and Republican nominee for vice president, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, are the only ones who will be able to make the changes needed to live up to these ideals.

Johnson says Trump will support military and combat terrorism

Rather than spending his time promoting Trump, Johnson focused on Clinton’s faults and the issue of protecting against terrorism.

Johnson said Clinton is unfit to be president because she repeatedly lies to the American people. He pointed to her response to the Benghazi attack in 2012 as an example of her untrustworthiness.

“If we can’t trust her to tell us the truth, how can we trust her to lead America?” he said.

The next commander in chief must back against terrorist attacks and confront the violent events that are occurring around the world, Johnson said.

He said the U.S. needs strong leadership that will make economic changes, secure borders and create a stronger military. The ultimate goal for the next president should be to defeat ISIS so the American people can once again live in freedom, Johnson said.

Trump and Pence are strong leaders who have an understanding of these priorities, Johnson said, and will work to create a safe, prosperous and secure America.

Clinton maintains lead in presidential race for Wisconsin votersAccording to the most recent Marquette Law School poll released Wednesday, presumptive Democratic nominee for president Hillary Clinton keeps up …

Milwaukee Sheriff looks to Trump for safety in America

At the convention, Clarke focused his attention domestic safety.

Safety is a fundamental right that applies to everyone regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, age and lifestyle, Clarke said. He said Americans no longer feel safe in their own homes.

Clarke said he grieves for the three officers killed in the Baton Rouge shooting, stating “blue lives matter in America.”

MPD outreach programs work to improve community relationsWith the recent arrest of Genele Laird in Madison, and officer-involved shootings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota, the relationship …

To ensure safety, Clarke said it’s important for people to follow the rule of law so stability and fairness are maintained. Clarke said some of the actions of the Black Lives Matter movement go beyond peaceful protest and move toward anarchy, violating the peaceful code of conduct that is important for safety.

Clarke said Trump is the presidential nominee who will support police and ensure safety for citizens.

“Donald Trump is the steadfast leader our nation needs,” Clarke said.

City officials stand in soldarity in response to Dallas shootingMadison Mayor Paul Soglin and several city leaders stood in solidarity with both police officers and victims of police shootings across …

Chair of Republican National Committee says Trump will further Republican goals

Priebus, Republican National Committee chair and University of Wisconsin-Whitewater graduate, said Republicans are the only ones willing to fight for the important values of “peace, prosperity, freedom and fairness.”

He said Trump will stop illegal immigration, attack terrorism, better the economy, ensure gun rights, promote safety and appoint conservative U.S. Supreme Court Justices. Priebus said America has had enough of Clinton’s coverups and corruption.

“This is our moment to set a new course for an America as strong and confident as we’ve ever been,” Priebus said. “Let’s stand united as Republicans.”

Wisconsin congressman and wife talk importance of the American dream

Both Duffy and his wife Campos-Duffy, a former reality TV star, said the electorate needs to rally behind Trump.

Duffy said the Republican party offers economic freedom that gives people the opportunity to grow and improve their economic position. He said Democrats inhibit upward mobility by creating rules and regulations that crush American workers.

Campos-Duffy stressed the importance of working hard to achieve the American dream, a goal she said Trump would help further.

“The challenges in America have never been greater,” Campos-Duffy said. “We must meet those challenges.”

Voting in November? All you’ll need is your signatureA federal judge Tuesday delivered a major blow to Wisconsin’s 2011 law requiring voters to present a valid ID at …

Emily Hamer contributed reporting to this article. 

The post Key takeaways from Wisconsin conservatives at Republican National Convention appeared first on The Badger Herald.

Categories: Local Media

Walker appoints Daniel Kelly to Wisconsin Supreme Court

Sun, 07/24/2016 - 4:45pm

Gov. Scott Walker appointed attorney Daniel Kelly to the Wisconsin Supreme Court to fill the vacancy of Justice David Prosser’s retirement.

Kelly was one of the founding members of the law firm Rogahn Kelly and has defended cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and Wisconsin Supreme Court, Walker said at a news conference Friday. He said Kelly is an “accomplished trial and appellate attorney” and a leader among the state’s legal professionals.

“His extensive real world experience, combined with his intellect and integrity, make him well-suited to be an influential member of the Court,” Walker said.

Justice Prosser announces retirement after 40 years of public serviceAfter more than four decades of public service to Wisconsin, Justice David Prosser announced Wednesday he will retire July 31. According …

Walker said Kelly has also been involved in the community and served as the president of the Milwaukee Lawyer’s Chapter of the Federalist Society. Kelly was also part of the State Advisory Board to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

Kelly said he was honored to be appointed to the state Supreme Court. He will officially join the Supreme Court once Prosser’s retirement takes effect July 31.

“I look forward to working with my new colleagues in serving the people of this great state by faithfully applying the laws of our land,” Kelly said.

The post Walker appoints Daniel Kelly to Wisconsin Supreme Court appeared first on The Badger Herald.

Categories: Local Media

Walker endorses Trump at the Republican National Convention

Fri, 07/22/2016 - 12:16pm

Following Donald Trump’s official nomination as the Republican candidate for the 2016 presidential election, Gov. Scott Walker spoke at the Republican National Convention endorsing Trump Wednesday evening.

Walker’s mantra of the night was “America deserves better,” stating that a vote for anyone other than Trump would be a vote for the presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

Walker emphasized that Republicans cannot hold out for a different candidate four years down the road, and instead must support Trump now.

“The consequences are too great,” Walker said. “After hearing the FBI’s report a few weeks ago, heck I listened to that and I wouldn’t even give Hillary Clinton the password to my iPhone, let alone access to highly classified information.”

Wisconsin voter support tips toward Democrats in presidential raceAccording to the most recent Marquette Law School poll released Wednesday, presumptive Democratic nominee for president Hillary Clinton has taken …

Beyond just the presidency, Walker also pointed to the importance of the U.S. Supreme Court. He implied that the power balance of the Supreme Court for the next 30 years relies on this election. The president nominates new Supreme Court justices and three are expected to retire over the next decade.

Walker did not address specific qualities that make Trump fit for president, other than the fact that he is not Clinton.

Instead, Walker demonstrated his support by illustrating the alignment of his and Trump’s values through a series of “we believe” statements. The statements included agreeing the national government should do everything within its power to extinguish radical Islamic terrorism, support the nation’s troops both abroad and once they return home and to return the power of Washington, D.C. back to state and local governments.

Walker asserted Trump’s candidacy is a stand against the “liberal Washington insiders” — much like how Walker beat liberal Washington, D.C. insiders’ trial when he overcame the protests and his recall election after the passage of Act 10 in Wisconsin in 2010, he said.

“The simple truth is, liberal Washington insiders created our problems, and Hillary Clinton is the ultimate liberal Washington insider,” Walker said. “[And that] is why we need to support Donald Trump and Mike Pence to be the next president and vice president of the United States.”

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Categories: Local Media

Protest for community control over police obstructs busy intersection

Fri, 07/22/2016 - 12:08pm

More than 50 people gathered to protest for community control over police on John Nolen Drive Thursday, resulting in traffic delays, obstructions and arrests.

According to a statement from the City of Madison, protesters represented several groups including Freedom Inc., Young Gifted and Black Coalition, Groundwork, No New Jail and First Unitarian Society, among others.

On their Facebook page, Freedom Inc. said the protest was meant to promote community control over police and accountability.

They are threatening to arrest anyone that is on the street. #FreedomNow #CommunityControlOverPolice pic.twitter.com/AlDcISveNZ

— Freedom, Inc. (@AboutFreedomInc) July 21, 2016

The protest began at 660 John Nolen Drive, home to the Wisconsin Professional Police Association and other businesses.

According to Channel 3000, Freedom Inc. planned to protest at this location as part of National Day of Action for Community Control. Protesters left the building after police asked them to and moved onto the intersection between John Nolen Drive and Rimrock Road, according to the statement.   

Protesters sat in the intersection and bolted their arms with chains and PVC pipes so police could not separate them. The protesters’ activities caused traffic delays during rush hour. The obstruction also created a safety hazard for motorists and pedestrians, causing several near-crashes and blocking ambulances en route to hospitals.

Most protesters cooperated when police asked them to leave the road, but a small group remained at the intersection until it ended at 6.30 p.m. Officer Kim Alan said officers could not clear the intersection quickly because they needed equipment to break the PVC pipes and chains.

Ten protesters were arrested for obstructing traffic and resisting officers.

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Categories: Local Media

Voting in November? All you’ll need is your signature

Thu, 07/21/2016 - 6:42pm

A federal judge Tuesday delivered a major blow to Wisconsin’s 2011 law requiring voters to present a valid ID at the polls.

U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman ruled voters without an ID will be able to sign an affidavit citing barriers to obtain an ID require “unreasonable effort,” for this fall’s presidential election. Wisconsin’s law requires voters to present a valid ID when casting their ballot.

American Civil Liberties Union senior staff attorney Karyn Rotker said it is surprisingly common for documents to not match, such as the name on a birth certificate and a social security card. People often have to go to court to fix these problems, Rotker said.

University of Wisconsin political science professor Barry Burden said the order affects the implementation of the voter ID law but people must still show ID if they are able to obtain it. People who do not have birth certificates, or have unreasonable difficulties obtaining documents need an alternative to a photo ID, Burden said.

“The judge said the law was unreasonable in their cases and that there ought to be an option for them to vote without an ID,” Burden said.

The groups most commonly known to have difficulties obtaining IDs are the elderly, students and the economically disadvantaged, Burden said.

The voter ID law was enacted in 2011, but because of other legal disputes was only enforced starting last year, Burden said.

Under the previous voter ID system, those without proper identification had the option to complete a provisional ballot, which would only count if the person was able to get proper ID within three days, Rotker said. Now, people can complete the affidavit to vote instead.

“People who have barriers to getting ID shouldn’t be prevented from voting,” Rotker said. “It’s failsafe for people.”

Burden said the ruling is somewhat of a compromise between those who support a strict ID law and those who do not think the law is necessary.

But advocates of the law say any weakening of the law may open the door to fraud and compromise its effectiveness, Burden said.

“If anyone can sign an affidavit, then it becomes a kind of back door to undoing the ID requirement all together,” Burden said.

Burden said students are expected to use the affidavit option more than others based on experience and studies showing students tend to have more difficulty in getting ID. Out-of-state students often don’t have a driver’s license or other kinds of ID that are needed and move frequently.

Rotker said most universities have voter IDs that students can get easily, but for students who are from out-of-state or whose campuses do not have voter IDs that adhere to state law, the affidavit acts as a “failsafe.”

“We are pleased that the court recognized the need for a failsafe to protect voting rights of people in Wisconsin,” Rotker said.

Burden said the ruling will be in place for the November general election, but not for the August 9 primaries.

The post Voting in November? All you’ll need is your signature appeared first on The Badger Herald.

Categories: Local Media

Petitioners, protesters clash at City Council meeting discussing support of police

Wed, 07/20/2016 - 10:17pm

More than 30 public speakers spoke both in favor and opposition of the “We Support Our Madison Police” petition submitted to the Madison City Council Tuesday.

After the council approved $400,000 in June to inspect the practices and procedures of the Madison Police Department, a petition was created to support the police chief and those working for MPD. The petition demanded the city cancel the study of police policies and procedures, invest in combating crime and work closer with police. The petition received 1,774 supporters.

Madison City Council approves $400,000 resolution to evaluate MPDAfter tense discussion, the Madison City Council almost unanimously approved a $400,000 resolution Tuesday to hire a consultant who will evaluate …

Throughout the meeting, tensions between those in support of the petition and those against it remained fairly high.

While Paula Fitzsimmons, author of the petition, spoke, a large group of people in opposition to the petition interrupted her multiple times. Mayor Paul Soglin repeatedly hit the gavel throughout the night, trying to reel back the attention to the speaker.

“We will stay here all night if that’s what it takes,” Soglin said.

Some protesters held signs at the meeting until Soglin asked for them to put them down, threatening to suspend the hearing.

Before the meeting, many against the petition attended a teach-in, calling for police accountability outside of City Hall.

T. Banks of Freedom Inc., one of the groups organizing the petition protest, demanded community control over the police. T. Banks said with community control over the police, instances such as those involving Cierra Finkley, Genele Laird and Tony Robinson would not have happened.

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King Banks, a Freedom Inc. youth organizer, also said as a black teen she doesn’t feel like she is able to call the MPD.

“I am scared to call the people who are supposed to protect us and serve us because they don’t protect all of us,” King Banks said. “They protect who they want to.”

Several MPD officers spoke in support of the petition. Many of them mentioned their personal difficulties in recent times.

One of the officers, Rebecca Lindsey said she understands people might not like the police.

“We are not perfect, I understand that wholeheartedly, but we try every day to do something better than we did the day before,” Lindsey said.

The petition will be referred to the Mayor’s office, then the mayor will report back to the council.

Ald. Mike Verveer, District 4, said at the last City Council Organizational Committee meeting, there was a conversation about MPD’s relationship with the community. He said at the next meeting, he hopes the committee will accept a recommendation to create an additional formal group to continue discussing this important topic.

“This is a critical conversation and dialogue and discussion that needs to continue and will continue both inside of city hall and outside of city hall,” Verveer said.

MPD outreach programs work to improve community relationsWith the recent arrest of Genele Laird in Madison, and officer-involved shootings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota, the relationship …

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Categories: Local Media